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20120528
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 217 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 12:00am EDT
have china china assets from the border with north korea. the last thing the united states or china wants is some sort of confrontation that would somehow cause them to butt heads as they did in 1953, so i think any time there is a serious thought given to some sort of military action this is constantly at the top, not even the top even halfway up the escalation ladder this is constantly the concern that i think every u.s. president has had to think about seriously, so that is certainly one of the reasons, the china factor, and the other is that we, the united states went into iraq or afghanistan because it became the top foreign policy issue on which the head ministrations of a resolution. now, we can debate whether there was the right or wrong finger. many americans think it was the wrong thing. many americans think nothing was resolved and, you know, that's a completely different question. i think the plant for korea is i don't really think that the north korea issue has risen to that level of priority. it's been a crisis the you want to solve at least in the sense of preventing
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 9:00pm EDT
. china sits right on the border with north korea. the last thing the united states or china wants is some sort of confrontation or a configuration of the peninsula that would cause the two to butt heads as they did in 1953, and so i think any time there is serious thought given to some sort of military action, this is constantly at the top -- not even the top, but half way up the ladder, this is a concern that every u.s. president, i think, has had to think about seriously. i think that's certainly one of the reasons, the china factor, and the other is that we, united states went into iraq or afghanistan because it became thee top foreign policy issue on which the administration saw a revolution, a final resolution. now, we can debate whether that was the right or wrong thing. many americans think it was the wrong thing. many americans think that nothing was resolved there, and, you know, that's a completely different question. i mean i think the point for korea is that i don't really think that the north korea issue has risen to that level of priority for an administration. it's been a c
FOX News
May 28, 2012 12:00pm PDT
the men and women who is died defending the united states in the first memorial day since the end the iraq war. the president laid a wreath at arlington national cemetery before saying all men and women who have fought and sacrificed their lives for the united states have the very same connection. listen. >> while their stories could be separated by hundreds of years and thousands of miles, they rest here. together. side-by-side. row by row. each of them loved this country. and everything it stands for. more than life itself. >>trace: the president vowed to take care of the troop whose make him heavy long after their service is over and moments ago the president held a ceremony at vietnam memorial as we showed you to mark the start of a 13 year project to honor the 50-year anniversary of the vietnam war. and now to ed live at the white house. ed the ceremony at wall was a long time coming for many vietnam veterans. >> it was. and that's because of the fact that when many of the vietnam veterans came home those fortunate enough to come home because over 58,000 who died during that conflict,
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 1:00pm EDT
interest in japan including strail, great britain, the netherlands, and the united states and the japanese. it shows the asian perimeter as it was before the war. and this was volatile to act out the stage of battle right here on december 7th, 1941. in order to show both sides of this, it shows the kind of the social structure of the united states, the political structure of the united states, and also the military structure of the united states. these are the newsreels that people watched in their theaters. this was their interpretation of the going crisis. this part of kpibs highlights the idea of espionage and code breaking. this machine here the purple decoder machine actually was scrambling the codes japanese had for their diplomatic mission. in fact, we were so good at this we were reading their diplomatic mail quicker than they were. this played a principal role. documents like this which is the war plan for the united states navy, wpl how the navy would conduct itself once the war started. it was believed by many that war would start somewhere out there not come out here to pearl h
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 11:30am EDT
of a yet-determined united states. the fact that not just slaves were free but that the slaves remained here had incredible consequences for the country. i mean, we can talk about the obvious good when we think about the freedom struggles of various different groups, when we think women, the current marriage equality levels. all of this stuff dates back to the civil rights movement which itself dates back to the civil war. one of the most stunning things i came across in my very recent study was when you start studying the women's rights movement and you see how many of those folks started out as emancipationists -- i'm sorry sh -- abolitionists. when you hear sarah gremke saying by looking into the rights of slaves i gained deeper insights into my own rights as a woman, that's a mangled quote but basically the essence of what she said. it is impossible for me to picture america as it is today without picturing african-americans as a political force, without picturing african-americans as a cultural force. where would we be without jazz? what is america without jazz, without its popular
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 7:30pm EDT
, the legal and constitutional history of the united states since the civil war is organized in large part around the reconstruction amendments and an ongoing battle to decide what the amendments that follow the civil war mean. many of the contests that are candidates for the legacies find one of their principle forums in the courts and in social movements that are claiming to articulate the true meaning with many different views of what true meaning might be of the reconstruction amendments -- the 13th amendment abolishing slavery, abolishing involuntary servitude, and giving congress the authority to enforce it. the 14th amendment, giving citizens privileges and immunities and giving the congress power to enforce. the 15th amendment, banning discrimination in voting. these are the three transformative constitutional amendments of our legal and constitutional history. and much of what's gone on since then in the law and constitutional law in the supreme court are a series of arguments about those amendments. this is played out in areas like affirmative action, race discrimination, so brow
SFGTV2
May 28, 2012 6:00am PDT
's an expectation. narrator: over 300 million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function cont
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 12:00pm EDT
boys quiet, i never imagined that i would be running for president of the united states. you just never know. [applause] but i also want to promise you, as you graduate from regent today and become an alumnus, he will never join a more defined are collect -- you will never join a more finer club. the dues were stiff, but the benefits are eternal, and will redound not only to you but the people you serve and minister to in the future but i want to congratulate you on one of the finest investment decisions you have ever made, and i don't just mean your new found her earning potential. your decision to come to regent was an act of sheer obedience. that's what it was for susan, and for me, too, the voice of almighty god could coming to reach into university was an excellent decision, it's like changing decision. my purpose today is to remind you that this day would not have occurred without the prayer and vision and work of countless generations who went before you. there would never have been a regent university, there never would have been this lovely, albeit hot ceremony today, without t
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 11:00am EDT
. gary is one of the most sought-after speakers on this subject in the united states, and his lectures are online or in many different places electronically if you want to look for them. stephanie mccurry, between andy and gary, taught for some years at san diego state and at northwestern and has been at the university of pennsylvania now as professor of history for eight, nine, maybe ten years by now. she was born in belfast. her family immigrated to canada. she went to high school in canada and then came to the u.s. to graduate school. she did her ph.d. at suny binghamton. she's been one of the most imaginative historians we have on matters of gender, race, class, among other things, about southern history and about american history. she -- her first book called "masters of small worlds" about yeoman households was a multiple prize-winning book and still rests on almost everybody's reading list and graduate reading list. stephanie only writes books that end up on graduate reading lifts. her newest book called "confederate reckoning: power, politics, and the civil war tsao," just won
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 8:00pm EDT
came to the united states, named first to massachusetts supreme judicial court and supreme justice and wrote the landmark decision that allowed same-sex couples to marry saying that that right was guaranteed in the messages of the state constitution. tell us about the right for gay rights and how that is seen. there a parallel with the earlier stories? >> yeah. i do. i mean, i -- i would like to flip it for whatever -- i was pretty down in the first part. but i was talking about. i mean, i live in virginia. and my legislature is -- there is no other word for it. they are neanderthals. and my partner and i have been together for 21 years. and we have decided to get married. it was a big decision not because we are not committed. we are more monogamous and more financially intertwined than any couple of now. but we were going to go to south africa because mandela got it in the constitution. and we thought what an extraordinary way to honor a man and a country that was really grappling with major issues. and then we decided to do it in the united states instead. and if i may be person
FOX News
May 28, 2012 1:00pm PDT
rates. so, the economy is moving and the united states is benefiting from problems in europe and china because we are seeing some monies flow back in the united states. that is all good, too, and the united states could be the prettiest horse in the glue factory but it is still a very sluggish economy and moving at a below par rate. consumers are the key. 70's percent of our economy they are. and if we did not see more savings where they have room to spend or we do not see incomes improving, they are just going to be tapped out that is a real no one. >> what about a catalyst for a shot in the arm for the economy, everyone is talking about the fiscal cliff that the bush tax cuts have to be extended. if congress can pull this off, will that alone give us a psychological lift and we will feel more comfortable spending money, taking longer trips and driving further? what do you think of that idea? >>guest: well, i am glad you brought that up because the federal reserve talks about when they keep the interest rates low they are trying to create wealth effect to get the stock market up, and
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 8:30am EDT
in the southwest united states, where cities that were, if you take certain cities on the edge of california, on their edge of los angeles, for example, that were -- had a conventional post war democratic and have now become 90 to 95% hispanic, this is a democratic that wasn't even in the 1960 u.s. census. that's actually a big transformation in a fairly short space of time. and it has consequences. now, when you put the why, i would do you care, that's the benign view. people think -- we were talking about broadway just we went on air. that's like the production of holiday pel low doll -- "hello dolly" and then he ran out of brassy, middle-aged blonds, and then he changed it to an all-black cast, and people think that's what happened if you have a muslim netherlands or muslim britain, there will be fewer pubs, the pubs will have to close, but essentially it will basically still be the same, and i don't think that's -- no serious person would argue that. >> host: on the cover of the new paperback version of "america alone" there's a little sticker, soon to be banned in canada. >> guest: that
PBS
May 28, 2012 12:00pm PDT
of that changed with his mother's assassinationment now he is in the united states to attend the peabody awards where a documenteer called bhutto is being honored. a visit to new york and his father's visit to chicago for the g8 comes at a difficult time in pakistani u.s. relations there is tension over a 33 year sentence given to a doctor without allegedly helped the cia identify some of bin laden's location. >> the united states does not believe there is any basis for holding dr. afridi. we regret both fact that he was con contribute-- convicted and the severity of his sentence. his help, after all, was instrumental in taking down one of the world's most notorious murderers, that was clearly in pakistan's interests as well as ours and the rest of the world. this action by dr. afridi to help bring about the end of the reign of terror designed and executed by bin laden was not in any way a betrayal of pakistan. and we have made that vi well-known and we will continue to press it with the government of pakistan. >> rose: there are also tensions over the deaths of 24 pakistani soldiers during a n
FOX News
May 27, 2012 11:00pm PDT
history. it began back in 2009 when we refused -- when the president of the united states refused to speak up on behalf of the demonstrators in the treats of tehran and gone from one episode to another. here over a year and now talking about possibly vetting some people. look, nearly 10,000 people have died. this is a brutal regime of incredible proportions and by the way, if bashar asaad failed it it would be the greatest flow to iran in the last 25 years because it would cut off hezbollah. et cetera. horrible things are happening in syria. this administration has a federal government feckless foreign policy which abandons foreign policy. i know because i visited with these people that they are willing to help these people and they are already helping them some. it cries out for american leadership. american leadership is not there. >> chris: let me follow up. there is a story on the front page of the new york times that president obama is considering trying to get assad out diplomatically with the help of the russians. how likely do you think that is? >> again, here we are a year later,
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 1:30am EDT
of the united states government and the president himself to actually conduct foreign policy. because a lot of foreign policy requires of course the cooperation of the legislative branch. it is not just difficult but impossible to imagine getting any major treaty through. maybe there is some chance of the wall of the sea treaty to get through. bruce has some better idea than i. but if you look at this as the two most threatening threats, the nuclear proliferation and the climate change. we are dead in the water because of the campaign in this town. one of the characters in american literature is quoted, pogo, we have met the enemy and it's us. that's the theme of what we are talking about. >> let me take it to you and your paper and the issues of ideas that lays out the idea. basically there are huge disagreements and different pathways in front of us. given the choices of barack obama and mitt romney. if you talk about that and where you see that reverberating, which situations around the world. >> sure, i think if things were going reasonably well in the world. it wouldn't make that much
NBC
May 27, 2012 11:00pm PDT
's the best fireworks i've seen here in the united states united states. >> live is always better. at home you can't cap purchase the spirit the way you can live. >> reporter: a historic moment. 75 years the golden gate has stood tall and proud in the san francisco bay. >> this is history in the making. 75 years of the golden gate bridge. it's nice to be part of it. >> it's majestic, i love it. we take it for granted but it's a beautiful part of the bay area. what else can you ask for? >> reporter: the bridge has deep symbolism for those who have laid eyes on it. love, prosperity, dedication. the golden gate touches people's hearts in different ways. >> we definitely see our family, it symbolizes an active family. >> my heart is here. it's got a lot of meaning behind it. >> reporter: families, friends, and those who have recently fallen in love. there's something special about this bridge. even a 6-year-old girl can sum up her feelings in one word. >> awesome. >> reporter: awesome is right. as for the 100th anniversary in 2037, i overheard people already making plans for it. a 10-year-old boy
MSNBC
May 28, 2012 8:00am PDT
in him. >> we're going to take a break. we will have the remarks of the president of the united states as the tomb of the unknowns arlington national cemetery. . >>> former british counterterrorism expert developed tough mudder while at harvard business school. based on special forces training, it's a miles long obstacle course that inspires people and builds team work. with more than 30 events in 2012, tough mudder will earn more than $70 million. for more, r watch your business sunday morngs at 7:30. ahh, now that's a clean mouth. i wish i could keep it this way. [ dr. rahmany ] you see, even after a dental cleaning... plaque quickly starts to grow back. but new crest pro-health clinical plaque control toothpaste can help. it not only reduces plaque... it's also clinically proven... to help keep plaque from coming back. plus, it works in these other areas dentists check most. ♪ new crest pro-health clinical plaque control toothpaste. life opens up when you do. for extra plaque protection try new crest pro-health clinical rinse. a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body i
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 1:00pm EDT
in the united states. we know that arraignment of individuals like richard clark were ringing alarm bells at the white house level but again, at that point, we go back and look, the administration at that point was focused on things like the balkans and the kosovo war which was 1999 so issues other than -- >> host: putting out fires elsewhere with national security. now, you talk about this wave of al qaeda violence, and then they get back. sometimes because of their own actions, what caused the kind of temporary defeats the first-time? was it a launch into afghanistan? >> guest: well, it was the reverse of the coin we just outlined. they lost a sanctuary in afghanistan so the taliban regime was overthrown and in addition to that, we saw the u.s. approach that was focused mostly on clandestine services, the cia, the range of other intelligence services, nsa, geospatial and then special operations forces targeting in afghanistan and pakistan and other locations. >> host: you are talking about in 2001 how the u.s. sat back i sending in cia and special forces green berets working together on
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 10:30pm EDT
to combat terrorism. once again, i applaud david ferrara, the archivist of the united states, and those involved in putting together today's conference. i'm honored to have been asked to share these words with you and encourage young people in the audience today to pick up the mantle of ernie green and charlayne hunter-gault and roger wilkins and to serve as our nation's next generation of leaders in this ongoing struggle to build a more just and equitable nation and a more peaceful world. thank you. >> good afternoon. i'm sorry i can't be there with you today, but i'm glad to be able to welcome you to this terribly important conversation. though much has changed in our country since the passing of the civil rights act in 1964, our work on civil rights is far from finished. i saw this unfinished work firsthand first as a southern governor and then as president. through my national initiative on race, i worked to bring our country closer together across the racial divides to prepare for a 21st century in which we're all bound together. i'll never forget the horrific string of arson that
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 11:30pm EDT
the lives and legacies of the presidents of the united states. 7:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m. eastern. on c-span 3. >>> next on american history tv, a discussion on world war ii reporting and censorship and the experience of associated press reporter ed kennedy. mr. kennedy was fired in 1945 after he defied a military embargo by reporting on germany's surrender a day before the official announcement. in early may of this year, the associated press apologized for firing mr. kennedy. the national press club hosted this one-hour event. >> welcome to the national press club. i'm rick dunham, the washington bureau chief for hearst newspapers and "the houston chronicle," and in my extracurricular life i'm president of the national press club journalism institute which is the educational and charitable arm of the national press club that handles everything from the cutting edge journalism training to book racks and other book events at the national press club. this event is among other things a fund-raiser for the national press club journalism institute and the good programs we do so that every book you
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 9:35pm EDT
for the united states senate is his business background. it is legitimate to look for what kind of jobs he has created. the kind of jobs he has created are part-time jobs and minimum- wage jobs that do not have any health insurance. that is not the kind of job i want to create. there are different ways for venture-capitalists to deal with the situation like indiana. either you close the plant down, throw the people out of work, only hire back the younger workers. or you can retrain the workers, further education and training, invest in those companies and create full-time jobs at good pay with good benefits. that is the kind of record that would have impressed me in terms of creating jobs. what is wrong with mr. romney's companies providing the same thing? [applause] >> i have a lot of things to answer on that. in my view, the attack on part- time workers not having health insurance is the height of hypocrisy. senator kennedy and his family have a multiple real-estate empire across this country. that merchandise market has a free cash flow of $20 million a year. i am sure you know that your wo
FOX News
May 28, 2012 10:00am PDT
the united states is ready to stop iran from making nuclear weapons. what does that really mean? what will happen next. heather: general tom mcinerney, fox news military analyst and former assistant vice chief for the us air force joins us with more insight. first of all, happy memorial day. thanks for joining us. >> thank you very much, heather. heather: defense secretary leon panetta said we have plans to be able to implement any contingency we have to in order to defend ourselves. he went on to say the fundamental premise neither the united states nor the international community is going to allow iran to develop a nuclear weapon. my question for you, how are those words any different than what we've heard before or are they? >> well, they aren't much different than with we've heard before, heather, except we've done a couple things. number one, we have f-22s in the theater right now, the middle east, which is our top-notch air superiority aircraft. we have two naval carrier battle groups, the enterprise and the lincoln. so that is a step forward, a notch up on coercive diplomacy. h
NBC
May 27, 2012 5:30pm PDT
it with other countries. washington isn't buying it. in a statement, secretary clinton said the united states will intensify pressure on, quote, assad and his cronies whose rule by murder and fear must come to an end. specifically, washington plans to lobby russia, one of syria's last remaining allies. the uk has also been sharply critical. >> we're absolutely sickened, and the british government and across the international community, over what we've seen over the last couple of days. >> reporter: in turkey today, activists protested in front of the syrian embassy. >> we are now facing a unified. >> reporter: while condemnations are building, immediate action against syria still seems unlikely. the united states has consistently opposed military intervention. critics say washington is hiding behind russian and chinese opposition, because military action would be too risky in an election year. so for now, washington is trying to rally an international anti-assad movement. it's a slow process. richard engel, nbc news, tel aviv. >>> to politics now. both president obama and his republican chall
SFGTV2
May 28, 2012 5:00am PDT
in the united states. it is a historical japanese- style garden, originally billed as a village for the 1894 midwinter international exposition. after the exposition, a japanese-american partner along with john mclaren converted the exhibition into a permanent park. he over saw the building as the teagarden and was the official caretaker from -- until 1925. he requested the people of japan 1000 flooring cherry trees to be imported and other plants and birds and goldfish. his family lived in the garden until 1942. when under executive order 906, he was forced to relocate to an internment camp with thousands of other japanese american families. this barden was renamed the oriental tea garden and it fell into a state of disrepair. in the 1950's, we had moved forward and the rec and park renamed it the japanese tea garden. the first concessionaire was jack -- who many here had the incredible opportunity to honor. and we're very incredibly pleased to be planning -- planting a cherry tree from the consul general. the cherry blossom tree planting has become a tradition that allows us to reflect on
FOX News
May 27, 2012 9:00pm EDT
. president, we need a proposal taken up by this united states senate that is driven by good economics. unstead what we are getting is one that is driven by campaign rhetoric. >> who better to rundown these best choices than the former vice presidential candidate businessman extraordinaire someone who you would call a friend herman cain. welcome. >> thank you. (applause) >> what does mitt romney need in a vice president? what should be the attributes he is looking for? >> them one, someone that compliments his views. number two, someone who can also provide a sharpened message to the american people. thirdly, someone who has the depth of knowledge or the experience that will help him be president of the united states of america. it is a big job as you know it. if it were me i would look for someone who compliment those fields that i naturally bring to the job. >> if it were you which one would you choose? >> of those three, i would choose lieutenant wes out of florida. >> he wasn't one of the three? >> if it were me. >> you started in a fog immediately. >> he was one of the guys who ge
CNN
May 28, 2012 4:00pm PDT
and never again apologize for america abroad. there's no reason to apologize for the united states of america, and i will not do so if i'm president. >> errol? >> amazing, amazing. look, it's the name of his book, "no apology." he's made it a centerpiece of his campaign and it just didn't happen. politifact gave mitt romney a pants on fire rating because the reality is the president went to cairo and made major speeches, he went to the united nations, he spoke at the cia headquarters. he said over and over again the same things over and over again, which is based on shared values, common interests and mutual respect, he wants to inaugurate a new relationship between america and the world. it was something he campaigned on. it was something he promised. it's something he's begun to deliver on. never does he say i'm sorry. i'm sorry for what the united states has done. what he has said is that there's going to be a new policy. there's going to be a new approach. that he wants to have a new diplomatic relationship. he uses the words of diplomacy. >> do you think these stereotypes are
CSPAN
May 27, 2012 8:30pm EDT
and human rights struggles we face today. john f. kennedy. ♪ >> the united states of america is opposed to discrimination and persecution on grounds of race and religion. anywhere in the world including our own nation. >> this nation was founded by men of many nations and background. it was founded on the principle that all men are created equal. and this is a matter which concerns this country and what it stands for. >> i believe in an america religious intolerance will some day end. for all men and churches are treated as equal. >> it ought to be possible for every american who enjoys the privileges of being american. >> change has come to america. >> ask the support of all of this. thank you very much. [ applause ] >>> next on american history tv, a discussion on world war ii reporting and censorship and experience of associated press reporter ed kennedy. mr. kennedy was fired in 1945 after he defied a military embargo by reporting on germany's surrender a day before the official announcement. in early may of this year, the associated press apologized for firepling kennedy. the natio
FOX News
May 27, 2012 8:00pm PDT
deeply than the men and women who wear the uniform of the united states military. [applause] >> now, i realize that there is just as human as the rest of us and they volunteered to willingly do that which we don't have to contemplate. and traveling about and meeting people on planes and events and on the street, i am taken aback. thank you for your service. i did volunteer for politics 20 years and speak out on radio and print and speeches and of course on tv, i hardly view anything i have done has heroic. far from it. but when i consider thacs of our servicemen and women, i think of true heros and not the phony heos that we create out of the celebrities or sports or politicings. i am talking real heros who are incredibly underpaid and underappreciate will do the extraordinary work while being shot out or driving over a crudely designed bomb that is disguised over the places they travel. in a split second notice they may be thrust in thuation where the lives of their closest friend and their own depend on their actions . if they end up to tell about it they might have a decoration on t
FOX News
May 27, 2012 11:00pm EDT
highly trained in the united states military. >> since grueling recruiting process and involves sea and air training it meets the ultimate test and indourance. get down and start crawling . >> drop out in the 21 week training course is 70 percent and the missions they must carry out is physicalabilitis and mental toughness. it is the navy seal team carried out the killing of osama bin laden. they fearlessly went to the compound and went to bin laden they brought to justice the terror master mind. navy seals were involved in another mission in january 2009. they rescued captain richard philips after his cargo ship had been hijacked by somali pirates. >> thank you goys so much. >> seals shot and killed three somali pirates and rescued philips. navy seals continuously put themselves in high risk situations without the recognition being the silent heros and name of faceless sailors that stand up against the world's most dangerous threats. and adam brown was already a navy seal when he was blinded in one eye in a training exercise and then lost parts of his fingers on a dominant right ha
NBC
May 28, 2012 6:30pm EDT
decide who the president of the united states will be. >> and savannah, a little bit of history. veterans picked bill clinton over george w.h. bush and george bush over john kerry, who served in vietnam. this will be the first election since world war ii is which neither candidate is a veteran. >> thank you. >>> around the rest of the country, parades and tributes to the country's fallen service men and women this memorial day. that was the case in downer's grove, illinois, and c's kevin tibbles was there. >> on main streets in small towns and big cities, they marched. in honor of those who have served, in remembrnls of those who made the ultimate sacrifice. >> and lining the sidewalks, those old enough to remember and those who are not. for them, today is a day of learning. >> i think it's very important to impress upon them the sacrifices that other people make for the freedoms and the privileges that we enjoy here in the united states. >> it's important to know your history. >> in the nation's capital, the president paid tribute otthe toumb of the unknown soldier. in mt. vernon, new yo
SFGTV2
May 27, 2012 5:00pm PDT
each other. many people say that the united states should be a melting pot, and i do not believe in the melting pot theory. when you have a melting pot, you put all of the ingredients into the bowl, stir it up, and everybody loses their identity. in the asian pacific american community, there are over 150 languages, religions, cultures, everything you can think of, and we do not want to lose that identity of our own history, regardless of where our forefathers have come from. i want everybody to be proud of the language of their forebears, the religion, the history, the culture, the art. again, i do not want us to lose our identity in the community in this great nation. again, thank you very, very much for great leadership, to the board for this wonderful gift bestowed upon me, and let's go ahead and continue to hit the ball out of the ballpark. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, we are going to bring up our founded to say a few last words, but before he speaks, we would like all the previous speakers to come up for a photo with the board, so if the board me
SFGTV2
May 28, 2012 6:30am PDT
% of the water consumed in the united states. water is the basis for manufacturing many goods and provides the ability to clean and sterilize everything from computer chips to the surgical instruments used in hospitals. kelly: the minute that there's not enough water for businesses, industry, and individuals, they have to go elsewhere. and when they go elsewhere, jobs go elsewhere. your entire economy begins to suffer with the lack of clean water. narrator: while the water infrastructure provides for our health, safety, and economy, a growing concern is that the value society derives from water has not traditionally been reflected in the price we pay for water. man: when you take a look at how much people pay for water, as a percentage of median household income, it's usually less than 1%. and when you compare that to how much we pay for electricity and gas, cable tv, and internet, the bottom line is, in the united states, we don't pay a heck of a lot for water. curtis: at an average cost of about $2.50 for 1,000 gallons of tap water, it is a great bargain. garvin: but the rates that are b
CSPAN
May 28, 2012 6:45pm EDT
.m. in the morning and said it was the policy of the united states? and smith, not knowing whether it was the policy of the united states, but assuming whatever winston churchill would say must indeed be the policy of the united states, said yes. stalin went into the next room in which the shah's sister was come and announced to her that he was willing to pull russian troops out of iran who were there illegally. and i believe, it was the first victory of the cold war. it is interesting that there has never been a book study of this most important speech. until the light, who is an amateur private scholar, actually, i don't think after the publication of this book i can say amateur anymore, because this is a wonderful history. all the reviews confirm this. john lucas has said about it, but i read are supreme test with considerable care and i recommended in pedigree. there's now an enormous literature about the cold war. the very little about how it actually came about, and almost nothing about this address. this book fills the gap. phil has been a writer and lecturer at the american nazarene universi
PBS
May 27, 2012 6:30pm PDT
to the united states and said, "look what the united states is doing." you know, indefinite detention. the patriot act. you know, increase surveillance powers. "if the united states can do it, they certainly can't criticize us." and this happened in a number of countries. so, you know, we knew we had to look to ourselves in order to speak to the world. so we began to work with the aclu, pen did, to put together these public readings from these documents. >> you can't believe some of these documents that they've uncovered. and, you know, in a way it's a tribute to this country that the freedom of information act actually works. that you don't actually need wikileaks. like, there is an actual legal way that documents that are quite damaging to the people who committed these acts of atrocity. >> that's something that the book really chronicles is that this was not a case where everybody agreed with these programs. on the -- >> with the torture? >> right. >> you mean, people inside government? >> absolutely. >> there were dissenters? >> in the military, and in all of the intelligence agen
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